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Is your makeup making you look older?

We wear makeup to play up our best features and make us look more beautiful overall. Many times, more beautiful also means younger, and makeup certainly can go a long way in taking years off your face. However, certain makeup techniques can also make you look – gasp! – older.

One of the most common makeup mistakes women make is not changing anything at all from year to year. Let’s face it – we don’t have the same skin we had when we were 25, so the makeup tricks we used back then probably won’t cut it anymore. You might be able to achieve a younger looking face with something as simple as changing the stroke of your makeup brush.

Figuring out that foundation

You may not have as much acne to cover up nowadays, but that does not mean you can skip foundation. At the same time, just because you are starting to see some lines, wrinkles or age spots doesn’t mean you should pile on a mask of foundation to hide it.

That’s right – you need to find a happy medium. Wearing too little foundation can show skin discolorations, shiny spots and redness. Wearing too much foundation will make you looked weighed down and cakey – only accentuating lines and wrinkles.

Instead, choose a foundation with sheer, light coverage. If your skin is dry, a tinted moisturizer or BB cream might be perfect. A pressed powder foundation often looks good on oily skin, soaking up oil and offering just enough coverage.

Brush up on your blush

The color and technique you used for blush when you were younger most likely will not work on you anymore. First of all, you probably need to ditch that technique of dabbing it on the apples of your cheeks you learned in that teen magazine. In fact, this technique is not that flattering on anyone. At the same time, avoid applying color too low on your cheeks, as this can make your face look weighed down. The ideal technique is to blend the hue from the apples of your cheeks up along your cheek bone.

The color matters, too. As we get older, our skin tone changes ever so slightly, which requires us to change makeup colors, too. Skin tends to get sallow, so a warm undertone might not work as well as it used to. A color that complements your lip color is usually your best bet.

Liberate yourself from lip liner

Lip liner is not necessarily bad, but its use has changed drastically over the past decade or two. Liner darker than your lip color had a moment in the ’90s, but wearing this look now makes your style look dated – and your skin look older. At its worst, dark lip liner drawn too far outside your mouth’s natural lines can make your lip color bleed into those tiny little lines around your lips, emphasizing them.

However, don’t skip liner altogether. Liner can help define your lips and give your lipstick staying power. For the best, most youthful results, choose a color that matches your natural lip color or the color you will be wearing, then color in your entire lip with it after outlining. You’ll get long-lasting results and no bleeding!

What are you concealing, anyway?

Concealer is designed to (duh) conceal blemishes on your face, including under-eye circles. However, when your concealer is too light, it highlights, not hides, the very things you are trying to cover up.

Choosing the right color and texture concealer is crucial to best cover you up. If you’re covering under-eye circles, choose a product with yellow or peachy undertones to counteract the purplish color of the circles. Avoid concealer with green undertones – these are designed to neutralize redness from acne and other similar spots, and only make bags look worse.

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Lauren Stewart
By: Lauren Stewart

Lauren Stewart is a freelancer writer from Michigan. She enjoys writing about beauty, health and fitness! She is passionate about learning new ways to take control of her health and wellness and is a makeup and skincare junkie! You can contact her by emailing lrstewar@gmail.com.